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ALA | Frequently challenged books of the 21st century

24 Sep

ALA | Frequently challenged books of the 21st century.

It’s Banned Books Week!

From the ALA, here’s some interesting information.

Background Information from 2001 to 2010

Over the past ten years, American libraries were faced with 4,660 challenges.

  • 1,536 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material;

  • 1,231 challenges due to “offensive language”;

  • 977 challenges due to material deemed “unsuited to age group”;

  • 553 challenges due to “violence”

  • 370 challenges due to “homosexuality”; and

Further, 121 materials were challenged because they were “anti-family,” and an additional 304 were challenged because of their “religious viewpoints.”

1,720 of these challenges (approximately 37%) were in classrooms; 30% (or1,432) were in school libraries; 24% (or 1,119) took place in public libraries.  There were 32 challenges to college classes; and 106 to academic libraries.  There are isolated cases of challenges to materials made available in or by prisons, special libraries, community groups, and student groups.  The majority of challenges were initiated by parents (almost exactly 48%), while patrons and administrators followed behind (10% each).

And, the list of the top ten challenged books of 2010.

2010: 1) And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson; 2) The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie; 3) Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley; 4) Crank, by Ellen Hopkins; 5) The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins; 6)Lush, by Natasha Friend; 7) What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones; 8) Nickel and Dimed, by Barbara Ehrenreich; 9)Revolutionary Voices, edited by Amy Sonnie; 10) Twilight, by Stephenie Meyer

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Posted by on September 24, 2011 in Life, randomness

 

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2 responses to “ALA | Frequently challenged books of the 21st century

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