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Another round of shameless self promotion


I haven’t done this in a while, so here goes!

From time to time I’ll post up information about the first book I’ve written, called the Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider.  Here’s a little synopsis about the book, which is a western/fantasy.

bmprfront-smallElven magic meets gunslinger grit. What happens when two elven travellers find themselves in the United States in the middle of the Civil War? The Adventures of Black Mask and Pale Rider tells the story of two elven women who’s curiosity gets the better of them.

The wild ride takes them from the Union to the Confederacy and back again. Along the way they make enemies and friends and learn a little bit about this world, and about themselves. An adventure of six guns and sorcery.

The Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider isn’t the only book I’ve written, Canyons of Steel is also available.  Here’s a quick synopsis.

5.83x8.26_Front_EN-smallWhat happens when an old gun hand makes a decision to turn his life around and set a new course? In Canyons of Steel, Johnathon Tiberius Walker makes the choice of turning his back on the underground military of the Red Hand and try to make right his own sins. All because he wants his daughter to live in a better world than he does.

Both my first book, Black Mask & Pale Rider, and my second book, Canyons of Steel, are available for purchase online through many different online book sellers.

Lulu.com (where both books were published)

  1. Tim Holtorf Author Spotlight the front page store for my books on lulu.com.

Amazon.com (both in paperback and in kindle versions)

  1. The Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider
  2. Canyons of Steel

Amazon.co.uk (both in paperback and in kindle versions)

  1. The Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider
  2. Canyons of Steel

Amazon.ca (price not listed and currently out of stock)

  1. Canyons of Steel

Barnes & Noble (for the Nook)

  1. The Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider

iTunes iBook store

  1. The Adventures of Black Mask & Pale Rider

I’ve also written a sci fi novel (not published, but available for download) called Rocket Fox: Flight of the Nighthawk.  Here’s the synopsis:

Vulpinia Prime.  A utopian paradise on the edge of the Lupine Sector of Space.  The third planet of the Vulpine Star System, her inhabitants take to heart their age old adage that they are meant to protect the sector from any and all threats.  For many, it is an honour to be chosen at the many Academies of science, engineering, mathematics and even the famed military colleges that dot the planet.  Rarely has there been a serious threat which the Royal Vulpine Armada has had need to deal with.  But Article 16 of the Space Exploration Charter is there for a reason.  And for many of the cadets at the Chattingham Academy, they are soon going to find out why.

 

 

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Book numbers and how they change


The discussion of how much a book sells is often an interesting one.  A lot of people have a misconception of the numbers a book sells, and in particular, the numbers a book needs in order to make the best seller list.  This is even true of comic books, as those numbers have changed over the past 40 years.

As an example, the December 2013 sales list is an interesting one.  Taking the top spot for the month of December was Marvel’s Origin II, with estimated sales of over 131,000 copies.  The poorest sales for December was Oni Press’s Boy and a Girl with estimated sales of 364 copies.

Compare that to books of the past, I’ll pick 1969 at random.  The top selling book for 1969 was Archie with over 515,000 copies sold for the year.  The top selling book for 2013; Walking Dead issue 115 with over 329,000 copies sold.  While comic sales have picked up in the past two years (2012 and 2013), they’ve been no where near what they were years ago.  In 1960, the top selling book for the year was Uncle Scrooge from Dell Press, which sold over 1,000,000 copies.

This really isn’t indicative of a decline in interest in comics (or books for that matter).  It’s just that our consumption of media has changed.

I was going to mention novels as well, and the numbers for how many copies a novel needs to sell in order to make it to the best sellers list.  In the UK, a novel needs 4,000 to 25,000 copies per week in order to make it onto the best seller list.  In Canada, it needs 5,000 per week.  Those are pretty small numbers when you think about it.  The New York Times actually had to create a Children’s Best Seller list in order to move the first three books of the Harry Potter series just because those books had occupied the top three spots of the best seller’s list for over a year.

There’s always going to be a book or a series of books that makes the leap and becomes incredibly popular in a short period of time.  But the numbers needed to even scratch at best seller is incredibly low.

Even the numbers for comic books have been very low in recent years when compared to years past.  The last issue of Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen, which was being cancelled, sold over 150,000 copies.  Today, if a book sold half that mark, there would be no way it would get cancelled.  Again, this isn’t so much indicative of the book, but more how we as the consumers take in media.

There is a larger way of story telling now than there was back in the 1960s to 1980s.  We have newer mediums that will tell a serialized story just as well as a comic book, or even a novel.  With television and even the internet, we can access those stories just as well and be just as engaged in the process of story telling as we can with a book series or comic book series.

Our consumption of stories that involve these characters hasn’t changed, to be honest.  The way in which we read those stories has.

Sources:

Comichron: The Comic Chronicles (monthly sales lists and yearly sales list back to 1960)

Wikipedia: Bestseller (history of best seller and the numbers involved)

Diamond Comic Distributors (news and information about comics)

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2014 in Fun, randomness

 

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Ah, science fiction; Part 2!


Earlier today, I wrote a post about women in science fiction, citing Mary Shelley and D. C. Fontana as two influential women who helped contribute and redefine science fiction through their work.  It was, in a way, a response to the continued harassment of women by fedora wearing dudebros (and yes, I’ll still use that term as an insult until these fuckwads realize that they’re just whiney manchildren).

My post came no where near shedding a light on the number of women who have been involved in science fiction over the years.  One of those influential being Nichelle Nichols who is best known for her role as Uhura on Star Trek.  Fitting I should mention her, and fitting that I post this during Black History Month, because this one’s all about people of colour (with a heavy note of women of colour) in science fiction.

People of colour have existed for as long as there have been human beings.  I know, shocking, right?  Excuse my sarcasm, that was directed mostly to idiots.  History has shown that people of colour have had many influential contributions to society.  For example, when we count or calculate something, we use what are called Arabic numbers (technically, they’re Hindi).  Many great scientific discoveries were actually made by people of colour and some are techniques that are continued to be used today.  As an example, two thirds of the stars that are named are given Arabic names.  Two thirds.  Arabic astronomers were gazing at the stars centuries before Galileo ever did.

People of colour also had huge contributions to literature, as some of the folk tales that we often rewrite now came from African, Native American, or Asian origins.  We’re all familiar with the Japanese artform of anime and manga, and there have been a great number produced in Japan (it’s safe to say that the percentage of manga and anime produced in Japan that has made it to North America hasn’t even tipped above ten percent).

In North American aspects, science fiction has seen a great number of people of colour who have contributed to the genre.  Jim Lee, for example, who currently works for DC Entertainment, and had a big part in launching the New 52 and with the creative and story aspects of DCU Online.  But one of the biggest contributions happens to come from Dwayne McDuffie.  McDuffie was, first and foremost, a story teller, and a damn good one.  He created an entire universe of superheroes that reflected a world he saw.  Something that was lacking in mainstream comics.  That was superheroes of colour.  His Milestone Comics are well remembered, and his contributions have helped inspire a great number of writers today.

Women of colour have also had a huge hand in shaping not only our entertainment, but what happens in the real world.  I come back to Nichelle Nichols, who played the first black woman on television who was not cast in some stereotypical role.  During her first season of Star Trek, she wanted to quit, but at the urging of Martin Luther King Jr., she stuck with it.  She in known for the first inter-racial kiss on television between herself and William Shatner.  Nichols was also the inspiration for Whoopie Goldberg, who would later play the character of Guinan on Star Trek: The Next Generation.  Nichols would later be hired by NASA to find and promote space exploration to women.  The affect of Nichelle Nichols in one role on one television show that aired for only three seasons has lasted well past forty years and almost now into fifty years.

Sure, I hear people saying that she’s only one person.  Well, you’re not looking hard enough.

Currently, there are a great number of women of colour who are contributing to the sci fi/fantasy genres of fiction.  One such is N. K. Jemisin, who with her Hundred Thousand Kingdoms trilogy has created a world of intrigue, drama and interest.  Those three books themselves should become a movie series.

While finding authors who happen to be people of colour (and women of colour) who contribute to the sci fi and fantasy genres, there is one place that is dedicated to addressing the representation of people of colour in the genres of si fi, fantasy and horror.  From the wiki article:

The Carl Brandon Society is a group originating in the science fiction community dedicated to addressing the representation of people of color in the fantastical genres such as science fiction, fantasy, and horror. The Society recognizes works by authors of color and featuring characters of color through awards, provides reading lists for educators and librarians, including one for Black History Month and has a wiki specifically for collecting information about people of color working in these genres.

It’s interesting to note, in the wiki article it also mentions Muslim Science Fiction.  Go read the whole thing, it’s rather interesting.

I’ll be honest, I can’t fathom trying to deny the works of authors who are women, people of colour, or women of colour.  If you’ve never read any of the works of some of these people, then you don’t have the right to say “I think it’s not very good” because that’s like listing off any stereotype only because you’ve heard others say it.  Try it.  Like or dislike something on it’s merit.  Don’t dislike something because you’ve never read it and it happens to be written by a woman, or a person of colour, or a woman of colour.

I’ll end this with something I’ve mentioned before, which sort of explains the above statement.  Lord of the Rings is classified as the classic literature for the fantasy genre.  It’s the one that everyone tries to copy in some way, shape, or form.  It’s rich with history, and characterization, and wide landscapes.  But here’s the part that may get people mad at me.  Lord of the Rings, as a book series, is dead boring.  It’s page after page after page of WALKING!  Now, if anyone asks me whether I like Lord of the Rings I reply with “I liked the movies very much”.  Because the movies did a really good job of cutting out all the boring bits.  Cutting out the part with Tom Bombadil was a godsend because he managed to jump the shark on quite a few occasions.  Hobbits in trouble; Tom Bombadil!  Movies, great.  Book series, dead boring.

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2014 in Fun, Life, randomness

 

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February Writer’s Challenge: Ravenport FAQ


thebowhuntress

The February Writer’s Challenge is on, and so far it’s doing well.  I went above and beyond for the first day, and hope to equal that with today’s run.  This post is about answering some questions about why I’m writing this piece.  Here’s some interesting questions I’ve received about this project.

It’s about superheroes, why try to add in a mirror of real life?

When we write we often use real life as an inspiration.  So the characters and events I’ve created are based on things in real life.

So, you’re being an SJW by having two black characters?

No, not really.  In every city in North America, there’s a huge amount of diversity.  It would be extremely foolish to think that a large urban center would have only white people.  Even in Saskatchewan, there’s a large amount of diversity.  Since moving to Humboldt, I’ve noticed a great number of people from different ethnic backgrounds who live here.  Sure, this place started as a very white European population, but as years went by, people from different backgrounds moved here.  And many hold down jobs we’d consider higher professional, like doctors and lawyers.  It isn’t uncommon for someone of African or Western Asian ancestry to have a job in a small Saskatchewan town as a doctor.  That’s why the two main characters of Ravenport are both black, both female.

Yeah, but why do you have to make things gay?

If you mean “make things gay” by having a gay (or in this case, lesbian) character, again, sexual orientation is a fact.  There are gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender and so on people who live in this world and hold down jobs.  So yes, I made Chelsea Morgan, a.k.a. the Bowhuntress (pictured above) as a lesbian woman.  If you pay attention to the media and what politicians are doing throughout the United States (or trying to do with very oppressive voter ID laws, abortion bans and the like) then you could almost say Chelsea is triple cursed.  She’s a young, black woman, who is a lesbian.  Right now being black, being a woman and being gay are huge things that extreme right wing politicians hate.

So, it’s a SJW thing?

No, as I said before, it isn’t about social justice.  It’s about representation.  African American representation in media is sorely lacking.  So is LGBTQ representation.  So is First Nation representation.  And on, and on, and on.  Most of the comic books, television shows, video games, movies and books have white people as either the protagonist, or play the white knight who helps the poor brown people.  Ravenport is about people first and foremost, superheroes secondly, but it ultimately is about the lives, careers, friends and family of Yolanda Morgan and Chelsea Morgan.  Both of whom happen to be black women.

Yeah, but you’re a white dude.  Why can you think you can write something like this?

First, I’m pretty positive I’m not an expert on what it’s like to be a black woman.  But, I do have a creative imagination, and I do this thing called research.  Talk to people (like, surprisingly, black women), learn their stories, and above all, listen to them.  Each person has a different experience, each person has a unique way of looking at things, and we (meaning the rest of us) have to shut up and listen sometimes.

There’s another reason why I’ve decided to make this.  Yes, I’m a white dude.  You can put a picture of me beside freshly fallen snow and you won’t be able to tell the difference.  I come from a place of privilege.  And in this case, I’m going to use my privilege to try and increase representation.  This is where privilege can be used positively.  But you still have to be careful, take care in the writing, and be true to the characters.  Don’t slap stereotypes into place just because it seems cool.

Yeah, but both your characters are geniuses.  Isn’t that really kind of like a Mary Sue?  Aren’t black people not known for being like that?

First, I think you’ve got the wrong description of what a Mary Sue is.  Second, remember what I said about stereotypes?  If you pay attention to news feeds (and I mean all news feeds) you’ll find a great number of women of colour are doing incredible things academically.  So it’s not so far off the track that two women graduated high school at 15 or 16, went onto college and university and obtained Masters Degrees in their fields by 21 and 22.  That stuff happens, and is happening right now.

It’s still not very realistic to have a single mother get a Masters while taking care of a child.

Let me answer that question with a question; you’re questioning the realism of whether or not Yolanda Morgan can be a single mother, do extremely well in college, get a good job with a police department, but you’re okay with the fact she’s a voodoo priestess and can cast magic spells?  That part you’re okay with?  And, the fact she dresses up in a patriotic uniform, and hunts down criminals late at night.  Magic, and superhero ability, totally okay.  Single mother genius, totally unrealistic.  Is that it?

Why not place the story in a real city like New York or Boston?

I thought about that for a time, and while I think it would be cool for someone who may be reading this who might live in Bangor or Portland, Maine to go “hey, I know that place” this also produces a problem.  I don’t know that place.  It’s easier to make up a city, therefore you have control of the city planning, so to speak.  And I know it’s easy now to use Google maps to look up a place like Chicago or Boston for street names and addresses, but you don’t get the vibe or the feel of the place.  Taking you’re own experiences, you can insert a feel to an area of a made up city.  Which is what I did with Ravenport.  There’s areas that feel like Saskatoon, some that feel like Winnipeg, others that feel like Vancouver (all places I have been to, visited, or lived in).

In the end, I want Ravenport to ultimately be a good story.  That’s what it’s all about.  I believe in the characters fully, I like them a great deal, and I want to see how much trouble I can put them in.

 

 

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2014 Reading Challenge


http://24.media.tumblr.com/b1991597823f61cbfb93dfb37338abb4/tumblr_mykj9jxLDe1qb0j8no1_r3_500.png
graphic borrowed from prettybooks

So I’ve decided to take the 2014 challenge and read 50 books this year.  I’ve gathered a list of 25 of the 50 books this year.  In total, it means I have to read about 4 books a month.  Which isn’t too bad (unless you’re like me and you read slowly).  My list thus far includes book both on my shelf and on my kindle.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bc6c2huCEAAcyNj.jpg:large

Here’s the complete list of the first 27 books:

  1. The Sincerest Form of Flattery – John Walker
  2. The Blame Game – John Walker
  3. In The Details – John Walker
  4. Hal Spacejock – Simon Haynes
  5. Above Ground – A.M. Harte
  6. The Time Machine – H. G. Wells
  7. The War of the Worlds – H. G. Wells
  8. The Lost World – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  9. Carmilla – Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
  10. Treasure Island – Robert Lewis Stephenson
  11. The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
  12. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
  13. The Wind In The Willows – Kenneth Grahame
  14. White Fang – Jack London
  15. The Call of the Wild – Jack London
  16. Never Cry Wolf – Farley Mowat
  17. Paradise Lost – John Milton
  18. A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
  19. The Bells of El Diablo – Frank Leslie
  20. The Last Ride of Jed Strange – Frank Leslie
  21. The Haunted Mesa – Louis L’Amour
  22. 22 Milo Talon – Louis L’Amour
  23. Riders of the Purple Sage – Zen Grey
  24. Destry Rides Again – Max Brand
  25. Faith & Fire – James Swallow
  26. Ragnar & Juliet – Lucy Woodhull
  27. Ragnar & Juliet II: Concubine Boogaloo – Lucy Woodhull

Three books down, 24 to go.  For anyone who is trying to write, reading helps spark some imagination.  You can’t write if you don’t read.  Reading gives you a good insight into plot development, characterization, plus all of the gramar skills needed to put good sentences together.

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2014 in Fun, randomness

 

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Book Review: The Blame Game


BlameGameThe Blame Game is the third offering in the Statford Chronicles series of supernatural mysteries with Thomas Statford, private investigator and Keeper of the peace between gods and mortals.

In the third outing of private detective of the gods Tom Statford, a woman shows up in his office claiming to have been murdered. What’s worse is she’s a target of a fire god. With four other bodies involved, along with Chinese organized crime, Tom has to figure out who killed the girl, and who is using a god as an assassin. No big deal, right? Before it’s all over, this case will give the phrase “May you live in interesting times” a whole new meaning.

It almost seems like Thomas can’t catch a break.  He’s back with the love of his life and then she walks in.  The entrance of a mysterious woman was written like it was right out of a Mickey Spillane offering.  And she was in fact dangerous.  As it turns out, she was in control of a brothel and wanted by most every police agency on the eastern sea board, if not farther.

The Blame Game is another sampling of just how Tom gets into and out of trouble, most of it not his fault.  He’s shot at, beaten up, and nearly burned to a crisp when he comes face to face with the fire god.  The ending has a great surprise twist to it that should have been seen coming.

This was another good, quick read, with lots of action and a decent amount of description involved to keep the story flowing.  John G Walker brings out another excellent chapter in the life of Thomas Statford.  Highly recommend this one to anyone who enjoys crime noir and urban fantasy, though this one had a helping dose of international intrigue involved in it.

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2014 in Fun, randomness

 

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Something to look forward to


This time of year is always a bit of a bust for me.  Christmas and New Years has passed, and it’s the dark days of winter.  Not really dark, because the days are starting to get longer again.  But it has aspects of darkness because there’s really nothing exciting to look forward to.

So I have to make things up in order to keep going.  At least keep myself from falling further into depression.  I’ve started a list for myself that will hopefully last for the next month, if not longer.

  • Finish reading the Statford Chronicles
  • Begin reading Ragnar & Juliet (both of these are part of my 2014 reading challenge).
  • Begin writing for the February Writer’s Challenge, 1,000 words a day.

That’s three things I’ve managed to list.  This, of course, is not including the regular things that I have to do during the course of each week.  Then there’s the little things that sort of pick me up.  Like this past week, I got my cellphone bill.  I had a credit.  I huge credit.  That made me happy, because that’s one thing I don’t have to worry about for the monthly budget for a while.

I have a few other things I need to sort out and hopefully they will take some time and I’ll be able to look forward to April and May.  Spring time, when things start to come alive and the darkness becomes just a memory.

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2014 in Life, randomness

 

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Seeming Female: Gender In Digital Spaces


Tim:

The myth of the Fake Geek Girl and her perfidious sister, the Fake Gamer Girl, is like a pervasive popcultural weed. No sooner has the concept been debunked, uprooted and flung on the fire in one quarter than it springs up again in another, its scrappy rootlets osmosing sustenance from the plentiful strata of sexism, misogyny and wilful misunderstanding that underlie most internet forums. Such women, we’re told time and again, are whores and dilettantes: users who care about comics, games, cosplay or whatever other subset of geekdom you’d care to name only insofar as it allows them to manipulate the emotions (and, consequently, wallets) of shy nerdy boys so overwhelmed by the prospect of Actual Live Women that they promptly forget their dignity and roll over like dogs, unaware that the heartless objects of their unrequited affections are collectively giggling behind their perfectly manicured hands and mispronouncing Boba Fett on purpose. It’s like some bizarre high school revenge fantasy where the hot, popular girl who humiliated the geeky boy later tries to ingratiate herself with him for her own nefarious purposes by pretending to like Star Trek, but finds herself thwarted when, instead of falling for her sirenlike charms, he calls her a bitch in front of the whole school and somehow ends up a hero, pronouncing loudly all the while that she wasn’t REALLY hot, anyway.

Excellent read about gamers of all genders and how each is perceived in games. I admittedly gender swap in video games, but mine goes back to playing Tribes 2, Unreal Tournament and other FPS games. Female characters seemed faster, they didn’t lumber like the male characters, and overall they just looked sleeker.

Originally posted on shattersnipe: malcontent & rainbows:

The myth of the Fake Geek Girl and her perfidious sister, the Fake Gamer Girl, is like a pervasive popcultural weed. No sooner has the concept been debunked, uprooted and flung on the fire in one quarter than it springs up again in another, its scrappy rootlets osmosing sustenance from the plentiful strata of sexism, misogyny and wilful misunderstanding that underlie most internet forums. Such women, we’re told time and again, are whores and dilettantes: users who care about comics, games, cosplay or whatever other subset of geekdom you’d care to name only insofar as it allows them to manipulate the emotions (and, consequently, wallets) of shy nerdy boys so overwhelmed by the prospect of Actual Live Women that they promptly forget their dignity and roll over like dogs, unaware that the heartless objects of their unrequited affections are collectively giggling behind their perfectly manicured hands and mispronouncing Boba Fett

View original 2,123 more words

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2014 in Life, randomness

 

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The Book Challenge


http://24.media.tumblr.com/b1991597823f61cbfb93dfb37338abb4/tumblr_mykj9jxLDe1qb0j8no1_r3_500.png
graphic borrowed from prettybooks

So I’ve decided to take the 2014 challenge and read 50 books this year.  I’ve gathered a list of 25 of the 50 books this year.  In total, it means I have to read about 4 books a month.  Which isn’t too bad (unless you’re like me and you read slowly).  My list thus far includes book both on my shelf and on my kindle.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bc6c2huCEAAcyNj.jpg:large

Here’s the complete list of the first 27 books:

  1. The Sincerest Form of Flattery – John Walker
  2. The Blame Game – John Walker
  3. In The Details – John Walker
  4. Hal Spacejock – Simon Haynes
  5. Above Ground – A.M. Harte
  6. The Time Machine – H. G. Wells
  7. The War of the Worlds – H. G. Wells
  8. The Lost World – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  9. Carmilla – Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
  10. Treasure Island – Robert Lewis Stephenson
  11. The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
  12. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
  13. The Wind In The Willows – Kenneth Grahame
  14. White Fang – Jack London
  15. The Call of the Wild – Jack London
  16. Never Cry Wolf – Farley Mowat
  17. Paradise Lost – John Milton
  18. A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
  19. The Bells of El Diablo – Frank Leslie
  20. The Last Ride of Jed Strange – Frank Leslie
  21. The Haunted Mesa – Louis L’Amour
  22. 22 Milo Talon – Louis L’Amour
  23. Riders of the Purple Sage – Zen Grey
  24. Destry Rides Again – Max Brand
  25. Faith & Fire – James Swallow
  26. Ragnar & Juliet – Lucy Woodhull
  27. Ragnar & Juliet II: Concubine Boogaloo – Lucy Woodhull

Two books down, 25 to go, as you may have noticed I added two books.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2014 in Fun, randomness

 

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Book Review: In The Details


In The Details is the second book in the Statford Chronicles, by John G. Walker.  Here’s the summary.

Private detective Tom Statford has a problem. A priest has been murdered in Hampton Roads, Virginia. That’s bad. His killer is claiming the Devil as an accomplice, sending the forces of Heaven after the fallen angel. That’s even worse. Lucifer comes to Tom to proclaim his innocence, which makes Tom’s life more interesting than it needs to be, and he’s the only one who can prove the Devil didn’t make the killer do it. But who would believe the Prince of Lies?

So Thomas Statford’s new client is the Devil himself.  And Thomas has the undaunting task of investigating a murder that has been blamed on Lucifer, but the Devil is claiming innocence.  It becomes even more difficult when Tom is given only three days to solve the case, considering that if he doesn’t the world will end thank to apocalyptic prophesy.  Devils, archangels, and humanity collide in this offering from Walker.

Again, another good, quick read.  Getting the story from Tom’s point of view gave a good chase aspect to everything.  He gets beaten up, gets chased around, has to find the clues, and you ride along with him.  One of the things I found was how quickly he has a suspect.  But having the suspect isn’t the easy part.  Considering he has to give this information to the archangel Michael in order to prove Lucifer’s innocence.  Statford has A and he has D, but he needs B and C before Michael will call off the hunt for his fallen brother’s head.

We get a bit more about Statford’s mom in this book, and there’s just as many questions about her as there is about the crazy stuff Tom deals with.  Close friend Mac and Tom’s girlfriend Susy also make appearances, and I often wonder how they deal with all the weirdness Tom sees on a normal day.

Next offering is The Blame Game, which I’ll be starting tonight.  The series reminds me of a very light version of Sue Grafton’s alphabet crimes series, which has one book lead directly into the next.  Save for the fact Tom deals with gods and demons, while Kinsey Milhone deals with thugs and crime lords.

End tally:  good read, pick up this book for a nice ride and a good continuation from the first book, The Sincerest Form of Flattery.

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2014 in Fun, randomness

 

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